Macrohistory Seminar – Eliana La Ferrara (Bocconi University)

News vs. Novelas: Can Entertainment Media Undermine Dictatorships? with A. Chong, C. Ferraz, F. Finan, L. Meloni This paper investigates the extent to which media vehicles are prone to political capture in the context of the Brazilian dictatorship. We study the effects of Rede Globo, the primary Brazilian television station,...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Guy Michaels (LSE)

Flooded Cities with Adriana Kocornik-Mina, Thomas K.J. McDermott, and Ferdinand Rauch Does economic activity relocate away from areas that are at high risk of recurring shocks? We examine this question in the context of floods, which are among the costliest and most common natural disasters. Over the past thirty years,...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Alice Kuegler (UCL)

The Responsiveness of Inventing: Evidence from a Patent Fee Reform Do financial incentives induce inventors to innovate more? I exploit a large reduction in the patent fee in the United Kingdom in 1884 to distinguish between its effect on increased efforts to invent, and a decrease in patent quality due...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Fabian Waldinger (University of Warwick)

Frontier Knowledge and the Creation of Ideas: Evidence from the Collapse of International Science in the Wake of World War I We quantify how access to frontier knowledge affects the creation of ideas. We show that citing frontier knowledge is correlated with producing high-quality papers. Because this correlation may be...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Philipp Ager (University of Southern Denmark)

The Kindergarten Movement and the US Demographic Transition Abstract: This paper examines how the diffusion of kindergartens during 1880-1910 (commonly referred to as the Kindergarten Movement) contributed to the fertility decline in US cities. Kindergartens were a German education technology that got transplanted to US communities by German immigrants starting...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Benjamin Elsner (IZA)

Immigration, Voting, and Redistribution: Evidence from Post-war Population Transfers   In this paper, we study how immigration affects redistribution at the local level, exploiting a large and sudden population transfer as a natural experiment. In the late 1940s, 8 million forced migrants arrived in West Germany; these were culturally similar...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Melanie Xue (UCLA)

Autocratic Rule and Social Capital: Evidence from Imperial China This paper studies the consequences of autocratic rule for social capital in the context of imperial China. Between 1660–1788, individuals were persecuted if they were suspected of possessing disloyal attitudes towards the autocratic ruler. Using a difference-in-differences approach, our main finding...

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