Macrohistory Seminar – Alessia De Stefani (University of Edinburgh)

Waves of optimism: house price history, biased expectations and credit cycles Using the Michigan Survey of Consumers, I show that American households have heterogeneous expectations about the future of house prices, which largely depend on the history of past house price realisations in the local area of residence. House price...

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Elections, Policymaking, and Economic Uncertainty: Moritz Schularick on “Going to Extremes”

Moritz Schularick will present his recent paper “Going to Extremes: Politics after Financial Crisis, 1870-2014” (joint work with Manuel Funke and Christoph Trebesch) at the conference “Elections, Policymaking, and Economic Uncertainty,” jointly organized by the Becker Friedman Institute and the Hoover Institution. About the conference The democratic decision-making process is often...

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EABH Lunch Hour: Moritz Schularick on the Rate of Return on Everything

This talk will be the premiere presentation of Moritz Schularick’s (Professor at Bonn Graduate School of Economics)  recent study on the development of all asset returns during the 20th century in all industrial countries. In view of the current extremely low interest rates, his view on historical episodes with extraordinary low...

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No Price Like Home: Post-Capitalism and the Future of Housing

Berlin Art Week: Conversation between artist Christopher Kulendran Thomas and economist Moritz Schularick. The technological acceleration of the fourth industrial revolution is not only transforming capitalism but also opening up new possibilities for how housing could be organized. Artist Christopher Kulendran Thomas and economist Moritz Schularick consider whether real estate...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Mohammed Saleh (Toulouse School of Economics)

The Cotton Boom and Slavery in Nineteenth-Century Rural Egypt The “staples thesis” argues that institutions in a given region could be explained by the nature of production of its prevailing staples, whereby slavery is likely to emerge in “slave-conducive” crops, such as cotton, rice, and sugarcane. This paper evaluates the...

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