Macrohistory Seminar: Faustine Perrine (Lund University)

Gender equality during the French Development Process The enlightenment of the long-run relationship between gender equality and economic growth is hampered by the lack of information and resources on the various dimensions of gender equality. This paper is a first attempt to assess the size of the gender gap in...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Francesco Cinnirella (ifo)

The Role of Human Capital and Innovation in Economic Development: Evidence from Post-Malthusian Prussia The effect of human capital on growth may involve multiple channels. On one side, it can have an indirect effect by facilitating the adoption or creation of new technologies and by influencing fertility patterns. On the...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Sascha Becker (University of Warwick)

Religion, Division of Labor and Conflict: Anti-Semitsm in German Regions over 600 Years with Luigi Pascali. Abstract Anti-Semitism continues to be a widespread societal problem rooted deeply in history. Using novel city-level data from Germany for more than 2,000 cities and county-level data, we study the role of economic incentives...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Fabio Braggion (Tilburg University)

Credit Rationing and Social Stability: Evidence from 1930s China with Alberto Manconi and Haikun Zhu Can credit affect social stability? To answer this question, we turn to a natural experiment from 1930s China, where credit contracted as a consequence of the 1933 U.S. Silver Purchase program. Building on extensive archival...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Ferdinand Rauch (Oxford)

Of Mice and Merchants: Trade and Growth in the Iron Age with Steve Pischke and Stefan Maurer. Abstract The causal connection between trade and development is typically obscured by reverse causality, the endogenous location of economic activities, and confounding factors like institutions. To avoid these problems, we study this question...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Jonathan Goupille-Lebret (Paris School of Economics)

Measuring the Distribution of Wealth: Methods and Estimates for France, 1800-2014 with Bertrand Garbinti and Thomas Piketty Abstract This paper aims to reconcile the different data sources and methods that can be used to estimate the distribution of wealth: capitalization method (using income tax data); estate multiplier method (using inheritance...

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