Macrohistory Seminar – Philipp Ager (University of Southern Denmark)

The Kindergarten Movement and the US Demographic Transition Abstract: This paper examines how the diffusion of kindergartens during 1880-1910 (commonly referred to as the Kindergarten Movement) contributed to the fertility decline in US cities. Kindergartens were a German education technology that got transplanted to US communities by German immigrants starting...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Benjamin Elsner (IZA)

Immigration, Voting, and Redistribution: Evidence from Post-war Population Transfers   In this paper, we study how immigration affects redistribution at the local level, exploiting a large and sudden population transfer as a natural experiment. In the late 1940s, 8 million forced migrants arrived in West Germany; these were culturally similar...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Melanie Xue (UCLA)

Autocratic Rule and Social Capital: Evidence from Imperial China This paper studies the consequences of autocratic rule for social capital in the context of imperial China. Between 1660–1788, individuals were persecuted if they were suspected of possessing disloyal attitudes towards the autocratic ruler. Using a difference-in-differences approach, our main finding...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Jeanet Bentzen (University of Copenhagen)

Acts of God? Religiosity and Natural Disasters Across Subnational World Districts Religiosity affects everything from fertility and health to labor force participation and productivity. But why are some societies more religious than others? To answer this question, I rely on the religious coping theory, which states that many individuals draw...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Ola Olsson (University of Gothenburg)

Roman Roads to Prosperity? The Long-Run Impact of Infrastructure on Economic Activity This study documents that local areas which received Roman road investments as an exogenous intervention during antiquity, systematically have outgrown areas that did not during the past two millennia. In particular, we find evidence of divergence in terms...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Mara Squicciarini (Northwestern)

Devotion and Development: Religiosity, Education, and Economic Progress in 19th Century France When and how does traditional culture hamper diffusion of knowledge and economic development? In this article, I use Catholicism in 19th-century France as an example of traditional culture, and focus on a crucial phase of modern economic growth,...

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