Macrohistory Seminar – Fabio Braggion (Tilburg University)

Credit Rationing and Social Stability: Evidence from 1930s China with Alberto Manconi and Haikun Zhu Can credit affect social stability? To answer this question, we turn to a natural experiment from 1930s China, where credit contracted as a consequence of the 1933 U.S. Silver Purchase program. Building on extensive archival...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Ferdinand Rauch (Oxford)

Of Mice and Merchants: Trade and Growth in the Iron Age with Steve Pischke and Stefan Maurer. Abstract The causal connection between trade and development is typically obscured by reverse causality, the endogenous location of economic activities, and confounding factors like institutions. To avoid these problems, we study this question...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Jonathan Goupille-Lebret (Paris School of Economics)

Measuring the Distribution of Wealth: Methods and Estimates for France, 1800-2014 with Bertrand Garbinti and Thomas Piketty Abstract This paper aims to reconcile the different data sources and methods that can be used to estimate the distribution of wealth: capitalization method (using income tax data); estate multiplier method (using inheritance...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Jeremiah Dittmar (LSE)

State Capacity and Public Goods: Institutional Change, Human Capital, and Growth in Early Modern Germany with Ralph Meisenzahl. Abstract What are the origins and consequences of the state as a provider of public goods? We study legal reforms that established mass public education and increased state capacity in German cities...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Marta Reynal-Querol (Pompeu Fabra)

Ethnic Diversity and Growth: Revisiting the Evidence with Jose G. Montalvo The relationship between ethnic heterogeneity and economic growth is a complex one. Empirical research working with cross section data finds a negative, or statistically insignificant, relationship. However, research at the city level finds usually a positive relationship between diversity...

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Macrohistory Seminar – Andreas Madestam (Stockholm University)

Surviving the Killing Fields. The cultural and political heritage of the Khmer Rouge with Mathias Iwanowsky We use evidence from one of history’s worst genocides, the Khmer Rouge regime, to study the causal impact of indirect experience of war on political beliefs, behavior, and trust 35 years later and find...

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